Government's efforts to reform and continuously improve public education have not gone unnoticed after a recent survey showed that the country’s public schools rank among Africa’s best based on the experiences of adults who had contact with the institutions out of 39 countries.

The survey was conducted last year by Afro-Barometer, an independent research network that conducts surveys on democracy, governance and quality of life.

It sampled 39 African countries under the title: “Interaction with public schools in African countries”.

Based on national surveys in the countries under the focus, 74 percent of adults who had contact with schools in 2023 said they found it “easy” or “very easy” to obtain services needed in public schools.

Zimbabwe was ranked seventh ahead of 32 other countries that include neighbours Botswana, South Africa, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Lesotho and Eswatini (formerly Swaziland), as well as Uganda, Morocco, Nigeria, Liberia, Cameroon, among other nations.

About 82 percent of adults in Zimbabwe said that they were treated with respect by the teachers and other school officials they dealt with.

Zimbabweans generally take education seriously with the Government increasing its support for the sector as part of efforts to drive sustainable development.

Under the stewardship of the Second Republic led by President Mnangagwa, the Government launched Education 5.0 model, a model anchored on teaching, research, community service, innovation and industrialisation with focus on moving the nation forward towards an innovation-led and knowledge-driven economy.

The model prioritises utilisation of local resources for social and economic development while producing graduates who solve national problems instead of just being job seekers.